Left of Black

A Contrarian View of Blackness

Posts tagged Duke University

4 notes

COURSE IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Michael Jackson & The Black Performance Archive

Duke University | Fall Semester 2014
Wednesday @ 6:15pm – 8:45pm | White Lecture Hall (107)
Duke East Campus


Instructor:
Mark Anthony Neal, Ph.D. | man9@duke.edu | 919.684.3987
Twitter: @NewBlackMan  


The course posits the Black Performance tradition as a living and breathing archive that helped produce Jackson’s singular creative genius within the realms of music, movement and politics, including the influence of Black vernacular practices like signifying and sampling, the network of Black social spaces known as the Chitlin’ Circuit, the impact of Black migration patterns to urban spaces in the Midwest (like Gary, Chicago and Detroit—all critical to Jackson’s artistic development) and Black performance traditions including Blackface minstrelsy. 
COURSE IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Duke University | Fall Semester 2014
Wednesday @ 6:15pm – 8:45pm | White Lecture Hall (107)
Duke East Campus
Instructor:
Mark Anthony Neal, Ph.D. | man9@duke.edu | 919.684.3987
Twitter: @NewBlackMan  
The course posits the Black Performance tradition as a living and breathing archive that helped produce Jackson’s singular creative genius within the realms of music, movement and politics, including the influence of Black vernacular practices like signifying and sampling, the network of Black social spaces known as the Chitlin’ Circuit, the impact of Black migration patterns to urban spaces in the Midwest (like Gary, Chicago and Detroit—all critical to Jackson’s artistic development) and Black performance traditions including Blackface minstrelsy. 

Filed under michael jackson archive Black Performance Mark Anthony Neal Duke University Fall 2014

2 notes

Black Cinema from Spike Lee to Tyler Perry to Ava Duvernay
Professor Mark Anthony Neal

Duke University
African & African American Studies—AAAS 390s-01
Program in Art of the Moving Image—AMI 390s-01
Visual and Media Studies—VMS 290s-01

Summer Session One
M.T.Th—12:30 pm – 2:35 pm
Perkins LINK 2 – 060

The release of Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It (1986) began a relative renaissance of mainstream Black filmmaking—a dynamic that was furthered with the emergence of accessible digital technology in the 1990s.  As Lee has maintained his status as a pseudo-Hollywood outsider (with measured critical acclaim), Tyler Perry has leveraged the spending habits of his base-audience to become the most commercially successful Black filmmaker of his generation. Within these two narratives are the struggles faced by Black independent filmmakers.

The course will examine contemporary Black film, with an emphasis on the role of Black film in the hyper-visuality of Blackness in the digital era, as well as the debates over what constitutes “Black” film, the distribution and promotional challenges faced by independent Black filmmakers, and the role of non-Black filmmakers in presenting the Black experience in film.

Directors examined may include: Spike Lee, Tyler Perry, Kasi Lemmons, John Singleton, Ava Duvernay, Dee Rees, Tonya Hamilton, Haile Gerima, Charles Burnett, Leslie Harris, Mira Nair, and Tim Disney.
Black Cinema from Spike Lee to Tyler Perry to Ava Duvernay
Professor Mark Anthony Neal
Duke University
African & African American Studies—AAAS 390s-01
Program in Art of the Moving Image—AMI 390s-01
Visual and Media Studies—VMS 290s-01
Summer Session One
M.T.Th—12:30 pm – 2:35 pm
Perkins LINK 2 – 060
The release of Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It (1986) began a relative renaissance of mainstream Black filmmaking—a dynamic that was furthered with the emergence of accessible digital technology in the 1990s.  As Lee has maintained his status as a pseudo-Hollywood outsider (with measured critical acclaim), Tyler Perry has leveraged the spending habits of his base-audience to become the most commercially successful Black filmmaker of his generation. Within these two narratives are the struggles faced by Black independent filmmakers.
The course will examine contemporary Black film, with an emphasis on the role of Black film in the hyper-visuality of Blackness in the digital era, as well as the debates over what constitutes “Black” film, the distribution and promotional challenges faced by independent Black filmmakers, and the role of non-Black filmmakers in presenting the Black experience in film.
Directors examined may include: Spike Lee, Tyler Perry, Kasi Lemmons, John Singleton, Ava Duvernay, Dee Rees, Tonya Hamilton, Haile Gerima, Charles Burnett, Leslie Harris, Mira Nair, and Tim Disney.

Filed under Black Cinema summer course Spike Lee Tyler Perry ava duvernay Mark Anthony Neal Duke University

34 notes

Left of Black S4:E11:  The Politics of Hip-Hop & the Hip-Hop of Queerness w/ Jasiri X, C. Riley Snorton & Mecca Jamilah Sullivan

Left of Black host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined, via Skype, by artist and activist Jasiri X, who discusses the value of social media, his work with legendary activist Harry Belafonte and the 1Hood Media Academy.

Later Neal is joined, also via Skype, by C. Riley Snorton and Mecca Jamilah Sullivan to discuss a special issue of the journal Palimpsest dedicated to the Queerness of Hip-Hop | The Hip-Hop of Queerness.  Snorton, an assistant professor of Communications at Northwestern and the author of the forthcoming Nobody Is Supposed to Know: Black Sexuality on the Down Low (University of Minnesota Press), is the co-editor of the special issue along with noted writer and critic Scott Poulson Bryant, and Sullivan, an assistant professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, contributed the essay  Fat Mutha: Hip Hop’s Queer Corpulent Poetics

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

*** 

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in @ iTunes U

*** 

Follow Left of Black on Twitter: leftofblack

Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan

Follow Jasiri X on Twitter:  @Jasiri_X

Follow C. Riley Snorton on Twitter: @CRileySnorton

Follow Mecca Jamilah Sullivan on Twitter: @Mecca_Jamilah

Filed under Mark Anthony Neal left of black John Hope Franklin Center Duke University Jasiri X 1Hood Media Paradise Gray Mecca Jamilah Sullivan C. Riley Snorton palimpsest queerness of hip-hop hip-hop pf queerness

22 notes

Filmmaker Byron Hurt Talks About His New Film Soul Food Junkies on the Spring Premiere of ‘Left of Black’
 

 
Byron Hurt’s late father was like the many Americans whose unhealthy diets led to a shortened lifespan.  Alarmed by what he saw as a problem among African Americans, Byron Hurt, whose last film was the award-winning Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes decided to a more intimate look eating habits within Black communities.  With Soul Food Junkies, Hurt travels from his New Jersey home to the deep South to find out more about Soul Food and its lasting effects on Black communities.  Among those featured in Soul Food Junkies, which debuts on the PBS series Independent Lens on January 14th,  are eco-chef and food activist Bryant Terry, Sonia Sanchez, Dick Gregory, Michaela Angela Davis, and Marc Lamont Hill.
 

 
On the January 14th episode of Left of Black Byron Hurt talks to host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal about his journey to Soul Food Junkies, the connection between healthy lifestyles and Black masculinity, the challenges faced by Black documentary filmmakers and the controversy surrounding Quentin Tarantino’s new film Django Unchained.
 

 
***
 

 
Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the FranklinCenterAtDuke Channel on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/FranklinCenterAtDuke
 

Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive.  

 
Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.
 

 
***
 

 
Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack
 
Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan
 
Follow Byron Hurt on Twitter: @ByronHurt
Filmmaker Byron Hurt Talks About His New Film Soul Food Junkies on the Spring Premiere of ‘Left of Black’

Byron Hurt’s late father was like the many Americans whose unhealthy diets led to a shortened lifespan.  Alarmed by what he saw as a problem among African Americans, Byron Hurt, whose last film was the award-winning Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes decided to a more intimate look eating habits within Black communities.  With Soul Food Junkies, Hurt travels from his New Jersey home to the deep South to find out more about Soul Food and its lasting effects on Black communities.  Among those featured in Soul Food Junkies, which debuts on the PBS series Independent Lens on January 14th,  are eco-chef and food activist Bryant Terry, Sonia Sanchez, Dick Gregory, Michaela Angela Davis, and Marc Lamont Hill.

On the January 14th episode of Left of Black Byron Hurt talks to host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal about his journey to Soul Food Junkies, the connection between healthy lifestyles and Black masculinity, the challenges faced by Black documentary filmmakers and the controversy surrounding Quentin Tarantino’s new film Django Unchained.

***

Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the FranklinCenterAtDuke Channel on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/FranklinCenterAtDuke

Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive.  

Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.

***

Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack

Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan

Follow Byron Hurt on Twitter: @ByronHurt

Filed under left of black byron hurt soul food junkies pbs independent lens soul food african americans mark anthony neal duke university

48 notes

Left of Black S3:E9 | Racial Passing and the Rise of Multiracialism

November 12, 2012

For many African Americans, the practice of ‘Passing’—where light-skinned Blacks could pass for White—remains a thing connected to a difficult racial past. In her new book, Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity (Baylor University Press), Marcia Dawkins, a professor in the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Southern California provides a fresh take on the practice arguing that passing in the contemporary moment transcends racial performance.

Dawkins talks about her new book with Left of Black host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal, via Skype.  Neal is also joined by University of Washington Professor Habiba Ibrahim for part one of a two-part interview about her new book Troubling the Family: The Promise of Personhood and the Rise of Multiracialism (University of Minnesota Press) in which she links the rise of Multiracialism in the 1990s to the maintenance of traditional gender norms.

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

***

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

Filed under Marcia Dawkins Habiba Ibrahim multiracial passing left of black Mark Anthony Neal John Hope Franklin Center Duke University

26 notes

Left of Black S3:E7 |  Hip-Hop, Religion & The Black Church

October 29, 2012

Left of Black host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Monica R. Miller, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Lewis & Clark College and author of  Religion and Hip-Hop(Routledge, 2012);  Ebony Utley, Associate Professor of Communication Studies at California State University, Long Beach and  author Rap and Religion: Understanding The Gangsta’s God (Praeger 2012); and Emmett G. Price III, Associate Professor of Music and African-American Studies at Northeastern University and editor  The Black Church and Hip Hop Culture: Toward Bridging the Generational Divide (Scarecrow Press, 2012).

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

***

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

Filed under Monica R. Miller Ebony Utley Emmett Price III Mark Anthony Neal Hip-Hop Religion The Black Church Left of Black Duke University John Hope Franklin Center

15 notes

From Lynch-Mobs to Dog-Whistles: Color-Blind Racism in the Obama Era; Sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva on the October 22nd ‘Left of Black’
In an era that some tried to define as “Post-Race,” many commentators have been quick to point out the “dog-whistle” racism that has become a feature of our national politics, particularly in relation to the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama.  It is a state of politics that Duke University Sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva recognized nearly a decade ago in his ground breaking study (now in it’s third edition) Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States.  Bonilla-Silva cautions us though, that those dog-whistles—from Joe Wilson’s “You Lie” outburst to President Obama’s depiction as the “welfare President”—are  part of an “old racism,” that while important to address, often obscures the ways that the “new racism,” a color-blind racism is impacting the lives of people of color
With his signature humor, Professor Bonilla-Silva, currently the Chair of the Sociology Department at Duke University, joins host and fellow Duke University colleague Mark Anthony Neal in the Left of Black studio in a wide ranging conversation about the Obama Presidency, the importance of the Black Left and the insidiousness of “color-blind” racism.
***
Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the Ustream channel: http://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlackhttp://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlack
Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive.  
Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.
***
Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack
Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan

From Lynch-Mobs to Dog-Whistles: Color-Blind Racism in the Obama Era; Sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva on the October 22nd ‘Left of Black’

In an era that some tried to define as “Post-Race,” many commentators have been quick to point out the “dog-whistle” racism that has become a feature of our national politics, particularly in relation to the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama.  It is a state of politics that Duke University Sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva recognized nearly a decade ago in his ground breaking study (now in it’s third edition) Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States.  Bonilla-Silva cautions us though, that those dog-whistles—from Joe Wilson’s “You Lie” outburst to President Obama’s depiction as the “welfare President”—are  part of an “old racism,” that while important to address, often obscures the ways that the “new racism,” a color-blind racism is impacting the lives of people of color

With his signature humor, Professor Bonilla-Silva, currently the Chair of the Sociology Department at Duke University, joins host and fellow Duke University colleague Mark Anthony Neal in the Left of Black studio in a wide ranging conversation about the Obama Presidency, the importance of the Black Left and the insidiousness of “color-blind” racism.

***

Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the Ustream channel: http://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlackhttp://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlack

Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive. 

Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.

***

Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack

Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan

Filed under racism without racist Eduardo Bonilla Silva Duke University Color-Blind racism President Obama Mark Anthony Neal Left of Black John Hope Franklin Center

3 notes

Left of Black S3:E5 |  October 15, 2012

Style Shifting with POTUS & Occupying the Music

Left of Black host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Stanford University Professor H. Samy Alim, co-author of, with legendary social linguist Geneva Smitherman, Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language and Race in the U.S. (Oxford University Press).  Later Neal is joined, also via Skype, by singer-songwriter Alison Crockett, whose latest recording Mommy, What’s a Depression? and blog Diva Against Insanity harks back to the socially transformative music of the 1960s.

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

***

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

Filed under Alison Crockett H. Samy Alim Stanford University Geneva Smitherman President Obama Language Race Articulate While Black Left of Black Mark Anthony Neal Duke University John Hope Franklin Center

2 notes

What If Du Bois had Twitter? Trailer for Black Thought 2.0 Conference


April 6-7, 2012
Duke University
The John Hope Franklin Center

Black Thought 2.0 will focus on the roles of digital technology and social media in furthering the mission of Black Studies. The conference will specifically explore how scholars are using technologies to further their research, do collaborative forms of scholarship and activism, and to reach broader audiences.

*All panels will be streamed and tweeted live

Friday April 6, 2012

Reception—5:30pm
John Hope Franklin Center Gallery Space

Keynote Address—7:00 pm
Black Futures: Doing Black Studies in a Connected World

S. Craig Watkins (University of Texas at Austin, author The Young & the Digital)

Introduced by Wahneema Lubiano (Associate Chair of African & African American Studies, Duke University)

Saturday, April 7, 2012

Panel #1 9-10:15 am
The Chocolate Supa Highway: Precursors to Black Social Media

Abdul Alkalimat  (University of Illinois)
Michelle Ferrier (Elon University)
Lynne d Johnson (Director of Strategy & Engagement at Whisprgroup)
Lee D. Baker (Moderator, Duke University)

***

Panel #2 10:30-11:45
On the Grid: Teaching and Researching in the Digital Age

Allison Clark (Founder AMedia1/HASTAC)
Kim Pearson (College of New Jersey)
Simone Browne (University of Texas at Austin)
Howard Rambsy II (Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville)
Thomas F. DeFrantz (Moderator, Duke University)

***

Noon-1:15 | Working Lunch—Social Media Demonstration

***

Panel #3 1:30-2:45 pm
From Jena Louisiana to Tahrir Square: Activism in the Age of Social Media

Jasiri X (Pittsburg based artist & activist)
Alexis Pauline Gumbs (Broken Beautiful Press/Mobile Homecoming Project)
Moya Bailey (Emory University/Crunk Feminist Collective)
Kimberly Ellis aka Dr. Goddess (artist, activist, historian)
Salamishah Tillett (University of Pennsylvania)
Treva Lindsey (Moderator, University of Missouri)

***

Panel #4 3:00-4:30
The Twitterati and Twitter-gentsia: Social Media and Public Intellectuals

Marc Lamont Hill (Columbia University/Our World with Black Enterprise)
Jay Smooth (Editor of Ill Doctrine)
Blair LM Kelley (North Carolina State University)
Latoya Peterson (Editor of Racialicious)
Imani Perry (Princeton University)
Mark Anthony Neal (Moderator, Duke University)

***

Filed under left of black Black Thought 2.0 Future of Black Studies New Media John Hope Franklin Center Duke University