Left of Black

A Contrarian View of Blackness

Posts tagged Black women

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Left of Black S3:E12 | The Politics of Pleasure and the Power of Alternative Politics

December 3, 2012

For more than twenty-years Joan Morgan, journalist, feminist thinker, and author of the classic When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life As a Hip-Hop Feminist, has been at the forefront of questions regarding the intersections of gender, sexuality and Transnational Blackness.  Morgan joins Left of Black host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal, via Skype, to talk about her new venture Emily Jayne Butters and Fragrances and her current scholarly work, theorizing the “pleasure principle” in the lives of Black Women.  Emily Jayne’s newest fragrance “Wench” is, perhaps, where Morgan’s two worlds, collide.

Later Neal is joined, also via Skype, by San Francisco State University Sociologist Andreana Clay, who talks about her new book The Hip-Hop Generation Fights Back: Youth Activism and Post-Civil Rights Politics (New York University Press, 2012).

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Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

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Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

Filed under Joan Morgan Andreana Clay Pleasure touch Black women hip-hop generation politics Left of Black Mark Anthony Neal

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Decoding the Images of Black Women; and The Musical Life & Death of a Chocolate City on the October 8th Left of Black


The election of Barack Obama helped inspire renewed interests in the lives and images of Black women, in no small part, due to the emergence of the First Lady, Michele Obama as an global icon of Black womanhood.  But the election of President Obama also inspired an exploration of Black Washington, D.C., whether in references to Ben’s Chili Bowl, the Vanilla-lization of a once “Chocolate City” or the infectious beat, that has come to be known as the city’s soundtrack.


On the October 8th episode of Left of Black, host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Professor Lakesia D. Johnson, author of  Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman (Baylor University Press) and longtime Washington, D.C. based journalist, Dr. Natalie Hopkinson, author of Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City (Duke University Pres, 2012).


Johnson is Assistant Professor of Gender, Women’s & Sexuality Studies and English at Grinnell College in Iowa and Hopkinson is contributing editor of The Root.com, teaches Journalism at Georgetown University, Director of the Future Arts and Society Project at the Interactivity Foundation in Washington, D.C., and  Co-author with Natalie Y. Moore of Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation (Cleis Press, 2006) 


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Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the Ustream channel: http://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlack


Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive.  


Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.


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Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack
Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan
Follow Natalie Hopkinson on Twitter: @NattyRankins
Follow Lakesia D. Johnson on Twitter: @ProfSoulSista

Decoding the Images of Black Women; and The Musical Life & Death of a Chocolate City on the October 8th Left of Black

The election of Barack Obama helped inspire renewed interests in the lives and images of Black women, in no small part, due to the emergence of the First Lady, Michele Obama as an global icon of Black womanhood.  But the election of President Obama also inspired an exploration of Black Washington, D.C., whether in references to Ben’s Chili Bowl, the Vanilla-lization of a once “Chocolate City” or the infectious beat, that has come to be known as the city’s soundtrack.

On the October 8th episode of Left of Black, host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Professor Lakesia D. Johnson, author of  Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman (Baylor University Press) and longtime Washington, D.C. based journalist, Dr. Natalie Hopkinson, author of Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City (Duke University Pres, 2012).

Johnson is Assistant Professor of Gender, Women’s & Sexuality Studies and English at Grinnell College in Iowa and Hopkinson is contributing editor of The Root.com, teaches Journalism at Georgetown University, Director of the Future Arts and Society Project at the Interactivity Foundation in Washington, D.C., and  Co-author with Natalie Y. Moore of Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation (Cleis Press, 2006)

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Left of Black airs at 1:30 p.m. (EST) on Mondays on the Ustream channel: http://tinyurl.com/LeftofBlack

Viewers are invited to participate in a Twitter conversation with Neal and featured guests while the show airs using hash tags #LeftofBlack or #dukelive. 

Left of Black is recorded and produced at the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University.

***

Follow Left of Black on Twitter: @LeftofBlack

Follow Mark Anthony Neal on Twitter: @NewBlackMan

Follow Natalie Hopkinson on Twitter: @NattyRankins

Follow Lakesia D. Johnson on Twitter: @ProfSoulSista

Filed under Lakesia D. Johnson Natalie Hopkinson Image Black women Washington DC Go-Go Chocolate City Left of Black John Hope Franklin Center Mark Anthony Neal

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Left of Black S2:E22 | March 5, 2012

Black Women’s Hair Matters and Black Queer Erotics in Cuba

 

Host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined in-studio by actress and playwright Chaunesti Webb, creator and director of the new play I Love My Hair When It’s Good: & Then Again When It Looks Defiant and Impressive.  Neal and Webb discuss the relationship that Black women have with their hair and the broader cultural meanings associated with Black women’s hair.  Webb also talks about her play, which opens at the Manbites Dog Theater in Durham, North Carolina on March 8th.

 

Later, Neal is also joined in-studio by Yale University anthropologist Jafari Sinclaire Allen.  Neal talks with Allen about his new book ¡Venceremos?: The Erotics of Black Self-making in Cuba (Duke University Press).  Neal and Allen also discuss the political and cultural significance of Cuba to Blacks in the United States and the power of the Erotic, per the work of the late Audre Lorde.

 

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Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

 

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Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in HD @ iTunes U

Filed under Chaunesti Webb Manbites Dog Theater I Love My Hair Black Women Jafari Allen The Erotics of Self Making in Cuba Duke University Press Black Queer

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Left of Black #33

w/ Lisa B. Thompson

May 9, 2011

Left of Black host and Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by scholar and playwright Lisa B. Thompson.  Neal and Thompson discuss the images of Black middle class women, the Tony Award nominated musical The Scottsboro Boys and the role of Black men in the production of Black women’s art.

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—>Lisa B. Thompson is a playwright and associate professor of English at the State University of New York, Albany where she teaches courses in African American literature, drama, theory, and cultural studies. Her book, Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class (2009), explores black middle class female sexuality through works by African American women authors. Her critically acclaimed off-Broadway play, Single Black Female, which was nominated for a 2005 LA Weekly Theatre Award for best comedy, has been produced throughout the US; in 2010 the play received its international debut in Toronto. Thompson is currently the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University.

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Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

Filed under Colman Domingo Lisa Thompson Scottsboro Boys Black Women Middle Class